What Causes Hearing Loss in One Ear?

You’re probably familiar with common culprits that cause hearing loss in both ears. Prolonged exposure to loud noises, aging, and hereditary conditions are all known to affect hearing, especially in older adults. While those causes typically affect both ears, it’s possible that only one ear could be affected. A host of external factors can also cause hearing loss in only one ear, otherwise known as unilateral hearing loss. If you’re experiencing hearing loss in only one ear, the sensation can be jarring. Luckily, unilateral hearing loss can be treated once you’ve identified what causes hearing loss in one ear. What Causes Hearing Loss in One Ear? Curable Illness Several common, curable illnesses can lead to temporary hearing loss in one ear. Everyday ailments like shingles or swimmers’ ear can both lead to unilateral hearing loss. Ear infections can also lead to temporary hearing loss by causing uncomfortable fluid buildup in one or both ears. Finally, an overproduction of earwax can…


What Causes Hearing Loss in Children?

According to the Palo Alto Medical Foundation, hearing loss affects 2 in every 100 children under the age of 18. Luckily, with modern medical technology, permanent hearing loss can be reduced and prevented. The key is early intervention. As a parent, it is important that you know what symptoms to watch for, understand what causes hearing loss in children, and have your child’s hearing tested once a year for the first three years of his or her life. This will help you confirm that your child’s auditory development is progressing normally. So what causes hearing loss in children? What Causes Hearing Loss in Children? Infection One of the most common causes of hearing loss in children is infection. Infection can appear during an illness like meningitis, mumps, measles, and whooping cough, or it can be the result of residual water in the middle ear. Over time, repeated ear infections cause skin to grow near the eardrum. This cyst or growth of abnormal skin is known as a cholesteatoma.…


Symptoms of Hearing Loss

If illness or injury causes an abrupt change in your ability to hear, it’s typically quite noticeable. However, many times hearing loss develops gradually, which can make it challenging to recognize that there’s a problem. What are the symptoms of hearing loss? What causes it? And what risk factors can leave you vulnerable to this auditory issue? Understanding the Symptoms of Hearing Loss Hearing loss can affect anyone. According to the Hearing Health Foundation, nearly 50 million Americans are dealing with some level of hearing loss. What do you need to know about hearing loss? The Symptoms of Hearing Loss Certain red flags can indicate that your hearing isn’t as good as it should be. You should consider the possibility that hearing loss might be present if you note any of the following symptoms: You frequently ask people to repeat themselves. You believe that most people mumble. You have trouble understanding conversation when two or more people are talking. You find it difficult…


Hearing Loss and Tinnitus

Ringing, chirping, hissing, buzzing, or even ocean waves – however you experience tinnitus, it can be annoying. Tinnitus does not cause hearing loss, but hearing loss and tinnitus are related. In some cases, hearing loss even gives rise to tinnitus. Hearing Loss and Tinnitus What Is Tinnitus? Tinnitus is the physical experience of hearing a ringing or buzzing when there is no actual noise present in reality. It is not a disease, but a symptom, and it can be temporary or permanent. Tinnitus is a sign that something is off-balance in the auditory system. This includes the ear and the nerve that connects it to the brain, as well as the parts of the brain that process sound. Causes of Tinnitus Tinnitus can be caused by many things, but it is often related to damage of the small hairs in the inner ear, which control the auditory signals sent to your brain. These signals determine how you hear sound, and they are often damaged by exposure to loud noises. Ongoing exposure to loud noises at…


Hearing Loss in Children

Hearing loss in children is not uncommon, and it affects kids’ lives in numerous, devastating ways. It can interfere with children’s social skills, affect speech development, and make it difficult for them to learn in school. So if you suspect your child may suffer from hearing loss, contact an experienced audiologist for a hearing evaluation as soon as possible. In addition, all children should have their hearing tested before entering school. If left untreated, hearing loss could prevent your child from reaching his or her full potential. Hearing Loss in Children How prevalent is hearing loss in children? According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, roughly 15 percent of children between the ages of 6 and 19 have low- or high-frequency hearing loss of at least a 16-decibel hearing level in one or both of their ears. Meanwhile, the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association reports that 8 percent of Americans with hearing loss that is rated severe to profound are…