The Process of Hearing

The world is filled with sound. A child’s giggle or your favorite song can delight you. Sirens provide you with an audible warning of impending trouble. The screech of an alarm clock demands that you rise and shine. Speech allows people to communicate, connect, and collaborate with those around them. Sometimes, people hear too much, and a cacophony of noises overwhelms them. On other occasions, the sheer absence of sound can seem unnerving. People spend a lot of time thinking about what they hear, but many take the ability to do so for granted. Have you ever wondered how the process of hearing works? Understanding the Process of Hearing How do people hear? How does the human ear transform a sound wave into something heard? While the senses of smell, sight, and taste involve chemical reactions, hearing is completely mechanical. Although people rarely think of hearing as an energetic activity, it actually involves a series of physical movements. Sound Waves Make an Entrance Sound is…


Oticon Studies Impact Of Noise On Stress

Straining to hear in noise is stressful for everyone but especially for people with hearing loss. Leading hearing aid manufacturer Oticon is the first to apply proven “pupillometry” science – a measurement of pupil dilation – to the development of revolutionary hearing aid technology that both reduces listening effort and conserves energy so that people recall more of what they’ve heard. In a just-released study, researchers at Eriksholm Research Centre and the VU University Medical Center set out to answer key questions such as how hard your brain has to work to understand speech in different environments and how that knowledge could be leveraged for use in new hearing devices. Their findings reinforce much of what is known about the impact of hearing loss and listening effort on cognition. “When we pay attention to sound, the muscles in the eyes contract and release based on listening effort,” said Thomas Behrens, Head of Audiology and Director for the Centre for Applied Audiology…


Scientists Examine How To Reverse Hearing Loss

Roughly one-third of senior adult citizens suffer from moderate hearing loss. With more people choosing to attend live concerts without the use of ear protection, and with more emphasis on volume than on clarity, that number of people detrimentally effected by sound will likely increase. However, according to a new study reported by the Atlantic, we might be able to reverse the effects of hearing loss. As the Atlantic explains the matter, “We owe our hearing to a tiny field of swaying cilia deep in the skull. Four rows of hair cells sprout in the snail-shaped cochlea of the inner ear, which is filled with fluid. Sound vibrations cause them to bend, opening pores that activate electrical signals bound for the brain. We are born with 15,000 hair cells in each ear, but unlike skin or other cell types, they do not turn over or replenish themselves. Loss of these hair cells over time accounts for much of the age-related hearing loss around the world, as well as that caused by too much loud…


Study Finds Testicular Cancer Survivors May Experience Hearing Loss After Cisplatin Therapy

Many testicular cancer survivors experience hearing loss after cisplatin-based chemotherapy, according to researchers at Indiana University. The researchers, led by Lois B. Travis, M.D., Sc.D., the Lawrence D. Einhorn Professor of Cancer Research at the IU School of Medicine and a researcher at the Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center, studied for the first time the cumulative effects of cisplatin-based chemotherapy on hearing levels in testicular cancer survivors through comprehensive audiometry measurements. They found that increasing doses of cisplatin were associated with increased hearing loss at most of the tested frequencies, involving 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 kHz. The research was published June 27 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. “In addition to hearing loss, about 40 percent of patients also experienced tinnitus (ringing in the ears), which was significantly correlated with reduced hearing,” Dr. Travis, also director of the cancer center’s Survivorship…


Phonak Receives Two Red Dot Awards For Design

Phonak, the leading global provider of hearing instruments and wireless communication solutions, today announces that its innovative approach to design has been acknowledged by the Red Dot judges who onJuly 4th will place their prestigious mark of excellence on two Phonak products: Audéo V10 and Roger™ Touchscreen Mic. The international distinction for high quality design confirms the attention given by Phonak to user’s needs, who demand not only performance but products with great aesthetics. The cutting edge high capabilities of the Audéo V10 hearing aid – which won out in the life science and medicine category – has helped those with mild hearing loss overcome the stigma of relying on hearing technology, being the smallest receiver in canal (RIC) hearing aid manufactured by Phonak. The intuitive Roger Touchscreen Mic – awarded in the communications/microphones category – offers teachers a state-of-the-art method allowing inclusion of schoolchildren with hearing issues. This…